FANDOM


French Polynesia is made up of five main island groups, Marquesas, Tuamotu, Society, Gambier, and Austral, with a mix of high and low basaltic islands and raised and low coral atolls. The islands and atolls are located between 8º and 28º S latitude and 134º and 155º W longitude. The mid-year 2002 population estimate for French Polynesia was 239,800 people (SPC 2003).

Tahitinui

French Polynesia has a large exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of around 5,030,000 km2, while only having a land area of around 3521 km2. French Polynesia has around 70 per cent of its EEZ bordering on international waters, with the remaining EEZ bordering three Pacific countries, the Cook Islands to the west, the Republic of Kiribati to the northwest, and Pitcairn Islands (UK) to the southeast.

Development Status of Fisheries (2004) Edit

(The original of this text was transferred, with the permission of SPC, from the original SPC technical report by Lindsay Chapman in 2004, and was compiled from interviews with island fishery managers and fishers. However, please feel free to make corrections to this Wikicity text if you have more accurate or more up-to-date information)

The development and management of the marine resources within French Polynesia falls under the jurisdiction of the Service de la pêche (SPE) of the Ministere de la pêche, de l’industrie et des PME. There is no specific fisheries legislation for the Service de la pêche (SPE) to work under. However, a National Development Strategy has been established with France for a four-year period.

The Service de la pêche (SPE) is working towards the drafting and implementation of development and management plans for some of the domestic fisheries. When looking at the nearshore resources, the two main fisheries are the deep-water snapper fishery and the tuna fishery. There is no development and/or management plan currently in place for the deep-water snapper fishery, although the process to draft one has commenced and it is hoped the plan will be completed by the end of 2004.

The management of the tuna resource in the waters of French Polynesia is very important to the government. At present tuna fishing is mainly conducted by private sector tuna longlining operations in the country. To manage the tuna fishery, the Service de la pêche (SPE) is taking steps to develop a tuna management and development plan for this fishery, with the aim of completing it by the end of 2004.

The following sections summarise the current status with background information on domestic development in the nearshore fisheries, in a range of areas. The main focus is on developments in the tuna fishery, both public and private sector, as this is where most effort has and is being directed. The tables provide a snapshot based on the information available at the time.

Edit

Current Status

No specific targeting of deep-water snapper species.

Mainly an ad hoc fishery with around 300 boats throughout the country using handlines, handreels and electric reels.

Background

Rural and urban fishing centres Edit

Current Status

13 fish processing and packhouses in Papeete with 7 of these exporting product.

Around 30 fish markets in Papeete and another 15 in the outer islands.

Government has installed many ice plants, 12 around Tahiti and 10 in outer islands, with these managed by local fishermen’s associations or cooperatives.

Background

Boatbuilding (public and private sector) Edit

Current Status

6 private sector boat building facilities. 1 building poti marara boats from 4.9 to 9.2 m in wood. 1 building 11 m wooden bonitiers. 4 building 13.5 to 30 m longliners in aluminium and steel – 1 of these companies to start using fibreglass soon.

One slipway with workshop facilities.

Many places to get repairs done on steel, fibreglass, aluminium and wooden boats.

Background

FAD programmes and or deployments Edit

Current Status

Government has an ongoing FAD programme, which includes regular maintenance of the FADs.

Currently 14 FADs around Tahiti, 3 in the northwest Society islands and 4 in the Tuamotu Islands.

In late 2003/early 2004, deployments are scheduled for 12 FADs around Tahiti, 8 in the northwest Society islands and 5 in the Australes group.

Background

Public sector development (small-scale tuna fishing) Edit

Current Status

Government is promoting private sector development.

Government provides training for local fishermen in small business management and on, on board handling and processing techniques and fish quality.

Background

Private sector development (small-scale tuna fishing) Edit

Current Status

Around 300 small-scale vessels around the country involved in trolling, vertical longlining and harpooning of tunas and other coastal pelagics, fishing the coast, tuna schools and around FADs.

Background

Public sector tuna fishing companies Edit

Current Status

There are no public sector tuna fishing companies as the government is promoting private sector development.

Background

Private sector development (medium-scale tuna fishing) Edit

Current Status

50 to 55 tuna longline vessels fishing to around 35 companies. 16 of these vessels process and freeze their catch on board ready for export.

Background

Joint ventures tuna fishing operations Edit

Current Status

There are no joint venture tuna fishing operations in French Polynesia.

Background

Sportsfishing and gamefishing Edit

Current Status

Around 15 charter vessels, mainly in tourist areas.

10 fishing clubs with around 30 tournaments held each year around the country. Tournaments attract from 10 to 120 boats depending on location and type of tournament. Professional fishermen are allowed to compete in some tournaments.

Background

Bait fishing trials or activities Edit

Current Status

No baitfishing trials or activities undertaken at present.

Background

Other fishing methods trialled Edit

Current Status

Many small-scale vessels throughout the country catching flyingfish at night using scoop nets and light attraction.

No other nearshore fishing methods trialled or used at present.

Background

References Edit

  • Dalzell, P. and G. Preston. 1992. Deep reef slope fishery resources of the South Pacific — a summary and analysis of the dropline fishing survey data generated by the activities of the SPC Fisheries Programme between 1974 and 1988. Inshore Fisheries Research Project, Technical Document No. 2, South Pacific Commission, Noumea, New Caledonia. 299 p.
  • Chapman, L. and P. Cusack. 1998. Report of first visit to French Polynesia (30 March to 30 July 1987). Capture Section, unpublished report No. 18, South Pacific Commission, Noumea, New Caledonia. 61 p.
  • SPC. 2003. Population statistics provided by the Demography Section of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Noumea, New Caledonia.
  • Whitelaw, W. 2001. Country guide to gamefishing in the western and central Pacific. Oceanic Fisheries Programme, Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Noumea, New Caledonia. 112 p.

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.